EXHIBIT

Ice on a Hot Stove: Textile Art by Norma Fredrickson

Saturday, May 6 – Tuesday, May 30, 2017

About the Exhibit

Opening Reception:
Saturday, May 6 from 6:00 to 7:00 PM

Join us for the opening reception of our latest exhibit – Ice on a Hot Stove: Textile Art by Norma Fredrickson – in our Upper Gallery. The event is free!

The exhibit features fiber art including paint, dye, stitch, cut, and fold techniques by local textile artist Norma Fredrickson.

“I fell in love with Clarke County the first time I saw it.  I vowed I would live here someday.  This collection of work reflects the joy this visionary finds in looking at the horizon here in this valley.”

Exhibit Dates:
Runs Saturday, May 6  – Tuesday, May 30, 2017

Exhibit Admission is free.
Our exhibits are open Tuesday-Saturday (Closed Mondays) from Noon to 3:00 PM as well as during concerts and by appointment.

Artist Statement

Norma Fredrickson in Studio

“Like a piece of ice on a hot stove, the poem must stand on its own melting.”  I found these words from Robert Frost when writing an artist statement over 12 years ago. (Confession: I do not like artist statements.  Often with textiles, there are gray lines between what is art and what is fine craft.  If the work fulfills its purpose, I am content.)

I practice textile art through the techniques of surface design and fabric manipulation.  I am neither painter,  printer, or quilter, but I do paint, print, and quilt.  My love of poetry and mathematical order shape my style. I use the friction between composed and improvised work both in process and in product. I pursue techniques to create and employ texture, shape, and composition. The exhibit includes paint, dye, stitch, cut, and fold techniques.  Select items in the exhibit are intended to be touched; participants are invited to do just that. It is part of the melting.

A friend described my style as” complex primitive.”  Daily life and rural landscapes are common themes in my work.  I strive for the work to be accessible to the viewer, but also to require a second look. Whether my art is displayed on an office wall, in a home’s entry, on a congregation’s altar, or over a woman’s shoulders, I like the work to both complement the space and engage the viewer.